Premature Birth Report Card grades are assigned by comparing
the 2016 preterm birth rate in a state or locality to the March of
Dimes goal of 8.1 percent by 2020. The Report Card highlights
priority areas for action with city and racial/ethnic disparities data
and a disparity ratio. Report Cards are intended to spur action to
improve equity and reduce preterm birth, with the goal of giving
every mother and baby a fair chance for a healthy pregnancy and
birth.

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If your baby is born with a birth defect or other health condition, he may need special care at birth and later in life. You may be worried and have lots of questions. It’s OK to feel this way. Resources provided by March of Dimes.

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Some factors affect breast cancer risk a great deal and others by only a small amount.

Some risk factors you can’t change. For example, the two most common risk factors for breast cancer, being a woman and getting older, are not things you can change.

Other factors you may be able to control. For example, leading a healthy lifestyle may help lower your chances of getting breast cancer.

Understanding which factors may affect your risk can help you work with your health care provider to address any concerns and develop a breast cancer screening plan that’s right for you. Provided by Susan G. Komen.

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Prenatal care is medical care you get during pregnancy. At each prenatal care visit, your health care provider checks on you and your growing baby. Tips and resources provided by March of Dimes.

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Screening tests are used to find breast cancer before it causes any warning signs or symptoms. Screening tests can find breast cancer early, when the chances of survival are highest. Resources provided by Susan G. Komen

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In the U.S., most people diagnosed with breast cancer will live for many years. Today, there are more than 3.5 million breast cancer survivors in the U.S. Resources provided by Susan G. Komen.

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