Charity Impact
Company Impact

To keep employees engaged, Northern Tool hosted an event every single day of their two-week giving campaign.  It’s the fourth annual campaign with Community Health Charities. The events centered on giving back to the community, and included impact speakers and volunteer activities benefiting partner charities. However, supporting the community doesn’t always have to be serious. The more lighthearted events included human bowling with tennis balls, candy grams, and birdhouse building for a charity partner.  Northern Tool hosted a “thank you” breakfast on the last day of the campaign to show appreciation for employee participation.

In addition to the daily events, Northern Tools’ team sent an email every morning updating employees on campaign progress and upcoming events. A fundraising thermometer in the lobby reminded employees of the progress they had made toward their goal, as well as the work that still needed to be done.  The owners of Northern Tool generously matched employee donations, as they have each year.

Northern Tool’s community focus doesn’t end with the annual giving campaign—it lasts all year. The company consistently provides outlets for its employees to work with the causes they care about. For example, full-time staff at Northern Tool  are given a paid day off every year to volunteer with a charity of their choice, plus the company hosts holiday drives to collect toys and donations for local charities and shelters.

Together, we don’t just give—we celebrate!

Community Health Charities company partner Medica’s 2017 “Together We” giving campaign didn’t just focus on fundraising. Instead, it focused on uniting the Medica community around a single cause:  Together we can make a difference.

The campaign kicked off with a picnic with over 900 Medica employees. The lunch was emceed by “Medtallica,” a band comprised of Medica employees. When the bass player unexpectedly wasn’t able to attend, a board member stepped up and jammed impromptu with the band.

The rest of the campaign was filled with events to keep spirits high, including a community showcase, raffles for parking spots, candy grams, service day projects, and a silent auction.

The campaign ended with canoe races where the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners that received a check to donate to their charity of choice, executives singing karaoke and a celebration of everything the Medica team did for their community, both volunteering and fundraising. Employees tied 20 blankets for a local charity partner, created 375 detergent packets, collected 500 bracelet kits for children in hospitals, and raised over $370,000 for charity partners.

Looking to host a giving celebration like Medica? Use our Volunteering on the Spot toolkit to find easy volunteer activities, like Medica’s tie-blankets, to engage your employees and build stronger, healthier communities.

Looking to engage employees? Try Lyft’s route: Promoting employee wellness and community involvement.

Based in San Francisco, Lyft is disrupting not only the transportation services industry, but employee engagement as well. This month, the VC-backed company hosted a week of employee volunteer activities across the San Francisco Bay Area with an impressive employee participation rate of over 90%.  Employees donated their time to help those in need – women, men, children— and even animals, with over 25 local charities participating in Lyft’s week of giving back to the community.

Community Health Charities was a proud partner in Lyft’s employee engagement efforts and assisted with coordinating volunteer activities for Lyft employees:

Covenant House California – serving at-risk youth. Young people staying at Covenant House were invited to Lyft’s corporate headquarters for an executive panelist discussion on career paths, a company-wide outdoor barbeque lunch, and a tour of Lyft’s colorful offices. It was a rewarding experience for the young residents at Covenant House– inspiring them that anything is possible with focus and determination.

      

Ronald McDonald Houses of both San Francisco and Stanford – improving the health and well-being of hospitalized children and their families through supportive programs, such as housing and meals. Lyft employees prepared healthy dinners for resident families at two local Ronald McDonald House facilities – San Francisco Mission Bay and Stanford.. In addition, other Lyft employees assembled Halloween gift bags for the Ronald McDonald House children and their siblings.

WildCare – rescuing wildlife in Northern California. Lyft employees from all over the Bay Area rolled-up their sleeves to build and paint a climbing structure for one of WildCare’s permanent residents, a blind possum. It was a day of team-building and creativity, followed by a tour of the WildCare facility.

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital – pioneering research and treatment for children with cancer and other life-threatening diseases. The hospital costs approximately $2.6 million a day to run, and there is no cost to be treated. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital relies heavily on donor contributions and fundraising events such as the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Walk/Run to End Childhood Cancer in late September. At St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital’s San Francisco office, Lyft employees rolled-up their sleeves again—this time to write thank you notes to generous donors and corporate partners who had participated in the Walk/Run.

 

How do you get your employees involved in workplace giving campaigns?

Michael Foods does it by having them involved in the planning process from start to finish.

Michael Foods is a seasoned Community Health Charities partner. They’ve found that their campaigns raise the most funds when employees join committees to handle campaign communication, monitor pledging, organize kick-off events, and more.

This year, employees staffed the Buzz Committee to get the word out about upcoming campaign events. Employees emailed a video every morning with campaign updates, walked around the office selling compliments grams— sometimes even while wearing a chicken costume, put lollipops with campaign information on employees’ desks, and hosted a departmental can drive competition that collected canned goods to deliver to charity. The Events Committee organized an executive relay race, sold ice cream from an ice cream truck, and hosted lunchtime bingo to raise money.

The best way to get your team excited about your campaign is by getting them involved. Check out Community Health Charities’ campaign resources and engagement resources to get your office more engaged.

What’s even better than one workplace giving campaign?

Helping your clients’ workplaces give to the causes they care about too!

Spirit HR, a professional employer organization that businesses use to outsource employee management tasks like HR, benefits and payroll, partnered with Community Health Charities to do just that. Their online portal, Spirit HR Gives, makes it easy for employees at client companies to support the causes and organizations important to them.

“We believe in supporting causes that help better the lives of those in our community and the Spirit HR Gives program is a perfect outlet,” explained CEO Dale Hageman. “Providing an easy way for our internal and worksite employees to contribute to their favorite charities is just another example of how we use our technology to enhance the employment experience.

Learn more about workplace giving and the impact you and your employees can cause.

The best way to incentivize employees? According to Sportsman’s Guide, it’s simple: Fun!

Sportsman’s Guide doesn’t utilize traditional workplace giving campaigns—there are no payroll deductions. Instead, the company hosts a week of fun events designed to engage employees and get them excited about giving back to the community. All of the week’s fundraising goes directly to Community Health Charities.  This year’s week of activity included a raffle for parking garage spaces, candy grams, and vacation time donations, a product sample sale, an impact speaker from a charity partner, a silent auction, and the crowd favorite: a carnival.

This was the first year Sportsman’s Guide hosted a carnival for employees. The event was held during lunch breaks and featured all the traditional aspects of a carnival: a variety of games, a prize table, authentic Mexican and Salvadorian cuisine, cotton candy, popcorn, and most importantly—a dunk tank.

The carnival raised funds three ways: the purchase of tickets used for games and food, sales of an employee-created cookbook, and shots at the dunk tank.  Management volunteered to be dunked, resulting in the dunk tank alone raising nearly $700! Participants could either pay $5 for 3 balls or $20 to simply push the button and dunk their supervisors.

Giving back causes a serious impact, but that doesn’t mean you can’t have fun doing it!

 

Doctors discovered Colton suffered from a high grade glioma tumor in September, and shortly after he underwent brain surgery. Colton’s family then turned to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital for his continuing treatment, including chemotherapy. “St. Jude spares no expense,” said Colton’s mom, Colleen. “It doesn’t matter the cost, they’re going to do what’s in the best interest of my child. The attitude is not to wait and see if something happens, but rather to make sure nothing happens.”

Oliver was placed in an animal shelter. He was sick, and showed signs of past abuse. He had few adoption prospects, but as a fierce advocate for rescue dogs, Betty, decided to give him a chance. Betty noticed Oliver’s sweet disposition and decided he would be a great addition to her growing therapy dog team. Betty and Oliver began training, quickly passed their evaluation, and soon after became a Pet Partners registered therapy animal team. Oliver now visits nursing homes, assisted living facilities, hospitals, and domestic violence shelters. Oliver shows unconditional love to others even with his painful history.

“His heart is here! Wake up!” Blake will never forget waking up to these words when her father received the call that would save his life and change the course of hers forever. Blake felt helpless when her father was on the waiting list, but after his successful transplant, she found a calling in spreading the word about organ and tissue donation. Blake became a NJ Sharing Network Ambassador at 13, and continues to share her story. She founded the Donate Life club at her high school, leads a 5k Celebration team, and plans to continue her efforts in college. “I am inspired by my Dad’s story, the honorable donors, and the students who have told me they changed their license to reflect ‘organ donor. “

During their 19-week ultrasound appointment, Sherry and RH’s excitement turned to terror when they were told their son’s bladder was abnormally large. To save their baby’s life, Sherry underwent fetal surgery. When Douglas was born, he was diagnosed with chronic kidney disease, and a rare birth defect called prune belly syndrome. Yearning for answers and action, Sherry received resources from National Kidney Foundation, and began personally spreading the word about kidney disease. Now almost three, Douglas has already been through 15 surgeries, but remains a happy, active little boy who loves tractors, Mickey Mouse, and playing with his older sister. Despite the many challenges he faces, his parents know he’s strong enough for the fight. His mother reflects on their health journey: “I want everyone to know about kidney disease, for people to get tested to become living donors. Not just for our son when the time comes, but for others waiting for the gift of life.”

Natalie has a very rare auto-immune disorder that causes blood clots. It took months to receive a diagnosis and in that time, it did substantial damage both physically and cognitively. While she realizes she is fortunate to be alive, Natalie experienced multiple brain infractions that impacted her spatial orientation and balance. Kohlie has been a life-changing gift, as she assists Natalie with bracing, balancing, and retrieving things that drop so that Natalie can avoid leaning over. Natalie lives alone, but with Kohlie by her side, she has the comfort and confidence to travel, and was even able to visit her daughter in California. “I waited for two and a half years for Kohlie. During that time, I was essentially house bound unless someone accompanied me, but now Kohlie and I go everywhere together. She gave me the freedom to be independent. She gave me my life back.”

A CT scan and a biopsy confirmed that a mass in Griffin’s pelvis was Ewing Sarcoma, a type of bone cancer that occurs most often in and around the bones and typically affects children and young adults. Every time Jill arrived at the hospital for her 8-year-old son Griffin’s chemotherapy treatment for Ewing Sarcoma, she posted signs and drawings on the blank hospital room walls. One sign hung above Griffin’s bed and his IV pole: “GriffinStrong,” it said, with the scribbled signatures of his classmates. “Childhood cancer works overtime to destroy families. It does to children what even strong adults crumble beneath,” says Jill. As Griffin left his last treatment, he had advice for other kids going through sickness just like him. True to the motto he has kept with him through it all, he says, “Stay strong. You can do it.”

Latinos and women are among the populations disproportionately affected by Alzheimer’s and other dementias. Paula Meza falls into both demographics, however, she was unfamiliar with Alzheimer’s until her mother, Hermina, was diagnosed. Hermina’s extensive medical needs in addition to working full time and being a student, quickly overwhelmed Paula.

Paula began to feel desperate and unfit to manage her mother’s care. Then, a co-worker referred Paula to the Alzheimer’s Association. Although hesitant, Paula quickly felt supported by receiving educational materials in Spanish and connecting with a Spanish speaking outreach coordinator who continues to check in with the Meza family.

Amidst the 2007 worldwide financial crisis, a large financial services firm looked inward to ensure the health and wellbeing of their employees during the chaos. What they found was bleak: Growing medical costs, underutilized employee wellness centers, lengthy medical follow-throughs, and poor medication protocols among employees.

Their solution? Realigning company priorities—linking health and key top-line metrics. They partnered with Community Health Charities to support their transition: They emphasized employee outreach, hired dedicated medical teams, focused on individualized support, created health and wellness incentives, and tracked employee progress.

The results? Employees were empowered to take control of their health: 85% of participants found the program extremely helpful. 32% saw a doctor. 54% started an exercise program. This led to reductions in healthcare expenditures, enhanced employee engagement, and reductions in healthcare expenditures.

Employee wellness doesn’t just increase your bottom line—it increases the happiness and performance of your entire team.

Jeff and Natalie Meyer opened Perk Place cafe three years ago in Oklahoma City with a simple business model: giving back.  Since then, the coffee shop has expanded to two more locations in Oklahoma. Each of Perk Place’s locations donates 25 cents of every transaction to their desired charities.

Along with their primary cause, Perk Place highlights a different nonprofit every month. The coffee is free from 7 to 8 AM, encouraging patrons to donate to the “generosity jar” in honor of the chosen charity. Perk Place has partnered with Community Health Charities to spotlight a variety of our charity partners; collecting an average of $400 per month for our charity partners. Thus far, Sharing Tree/Christmas Connection, Children’s Hospital Foundation, Limbs for Life, American Cancer Society, Muscular Dystrophy Association, Alzheimer’s Association, American Heart Association, and the Epilepsy Foundation of Oklahoma have been highlighted. Our partnership has helped multiple local and national charity partners raise health awareness and resources.

In the words of Perk Place, “generosity rules.”

S&C Electric Company, an electric power switching, protection, and control systems company headquartered in Chicago, had their most successful giving campaign to date this year, raising $98,000 for Community Health Charities.

How’d they do it? Friendly competition. Departments competed to have the highest percentage of team members donate to the cause, no matter the size of the donation. The campaign theme was “Our Giving is Growing,” and the campus was covered in posters of trees with empty leaves. Departments earned differently colored leaves on the posters as their participation increased. Team members who donated $5 or more earned an “I’m a S&C Giver” t-shirt and an ice cream social at the end of the campaign—by then, the campus was a sea of t-shirts. Over 50% of S&C team members donated, causing the 2017 campaign total to grow by 36% from the year before.

While the campaign lasted two weeks, S&C supports team members giving and volunteering in their communities throughout the year—it’s a part of S &C’s tradition of being a good corporate citizen.

S&C Electric Company is a Community Health Charities partner committed to employee engagement.

At SeriousFun camps, children living with serious illnesses get to experience many firsts. For eight-year-old Nevaeh, who attended Transplant Week at North Star Reach in Michigan, it was her first time to ever swim in a lake. On the first day of camp, when she first touched the water, she was timid and scared. Two days later, she was running full force into the lake toward her new friends with an exuberant grin on her face. Your support gives children like Nevaeh the opportunity to take healthy risks in a safe and nurturing environment.

Maxwell was diagnosed before birth with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), a birth defect where the left-side of the heart is underdeveloped, affecting normal blood flow. It can be fatal if untreated. Maxwell’s prenatal diagnosis gave his parents the chance to meet with cardiologists and surgeons and intervene early. After birth, he remained hospitalized on a feeding tube for over a month.

When he was three months old, Maxwell had a second surgery, and two years later he received heart catheterization. Maxwell is now living with a single ventricle, and has only been in circulatory arrest one time since. Maxwell’s story gives hope to other parents that all kids can have a fighting chance to be healthy and happy.

Rose was kidnapped off a city street by two men. One pushed Rose in the car and punched her in the face. He would later become her pimp. Rose’s life quickly spiraled into a nightmare of exploitation, rape and servitude. Rose wanted to fight back, but he threatened to kill her family. He reminded her that he knew her address – and what her little sister looked like.

Finally, an old friend recognized Rose and helped her run to a relative’s house. Unable to reconnect with her family or friends, Rose became homeless. She spent three nights on buses before entering the city shelter system. Thankfully, she found Covenant House. Rose can still barely stand to be touched, almost three years after escaping. But she is learning how to heal – slowly but surely.

Iraq War veteran and Purple Heart recipient Dale Beatty remembers the day his life changed forever. On November 15, 2004, Dale was injured when an IED explosion flipped his Humvee, causing him to lose both legs. “It’s amazing how clear everything becomes when you think your next breath could be your last,” Dale says.

Thanks to Fisher House Foundation, Dale’s wife and children were able to stay by his side throughout the recovery and rehabilitation process and received the emotional support they all needed to heal. “Without Fisher House, I don’t know what my prognosis would have been, or where I would be now not having my family next to me.”

Today, Dale plays in a band, golfs and works to help other veterans. “I remain forever grateful,” he says.