Play ball! Community Health Charities is teaming up with the Oklahoma City Dodgers and the Southern Plains Tribal Health Board to support American Indian health.

The three organizations are hosting the American Indian Health Fund Night at Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark on Friday, August 17. Tickets for the baseball game are a special rate of $16, with $2 of each ticket supporting the American Indian Health Fund.  The American Indian Health Fund is a program founded by Community Health Charities and the Southern Plains Tribal Health Board that supports and improves American Indian’s health.

Read the full article.

S&C ELECTRIC COMPANY RAISES $493,500 FOR COMMUNITY CHARITIES

S&C Electric Company employees raised $493,500 for three organizations supporting Chicago, IL including $141,295 for Community Health Charities and our members. The campaign was funded by employee generosity and S&C Electric Company’s 150% company match.

“We’re extremely grateful for S&C’s support of our mission,” said Thomas G. Bognanno, president and CEO, Community Health Charities. “Together with partners, we’re finding cures to save children with cancer, supporting our military veterans and first responders, and working to end bullying and human trafficking, which are difficult challenges. With S&C’s help, we’re one step closer to reaching these important goals in Chicago and across the country.”

Prioritize corporate social responsibility and institute a workplace giving campaign. We have the resources and expertise to guide you from start to finish.

ADAPT OR DIE: MOVING YOUR NONPROFIT FROM TRANSACTIONAL TO COLLABORATIVE

 

As technology and donor demands continue to evolve, many nonprofits that were strong and successful in the past are now struggling and left with a particularly daunting decision: adapt or die.

Community Health Charities President & CEO Thomas G. Bognanno shares his recommendations for how to make the switch from transactional to collaborative, helping your nonprofit remain relevant and increasing your impact into the future.

JEA’S PROVEN METHODS FOR SUCCESS

JEA, a publicly owned electric utility company, annually raises over $50,000 during their workplace giving campaign—peaking at $73,104.

How do they do it? Passionate employees, an organizational culture of giving back, and following tried and true methods of employee engagement and workplace giving. Check out the Giving And Engagement Case Study: JEA for proven methods on engaging employees, communicating with employees, setting up your campaign team, fundraising, and more.

LIBERTY DIVERSIFIED INTERNATIONAL CELEBRATES 100 YEARS BY GIVING BACK

Liberty Diversified International (LDI), a Community Health Charities company partner, celebrated their 100-year anniversary this July. The celebration consisted of a 19-day “Great Gratitude Tour,” where the organization gave back to 17 cities and celebrated with millions of dollars in giving. The tour concluded with a Grand Finale that presented 15 LDI nonprofit partners with gratitude grants, including Community Health Charities and four of our nonprofit partners.

We’re proud to partner with a company so focused on building stronger, healthier communities across the country. LDI’s campaign extended beyond community wellbeing to employee wellbeing as well, with 14 weeks of wellbeing resources in 100 Ways To Celebrate Gratitude Through WellbeingContact us and access our campaign resources to organize opportunities for your employees to support their communities.

INCREASE EMPLOYEE PRODUCTIVITY BY 22%

Employee engagement has never been more critical. Engaged employees are happier and 22% more productive (Harvard Business Review), yet most companies find employee engagement challenging. In fact, Gallup studies show 70% of U.S. workers are not engaged at work.

For simple ways to enhance employee engagement and reduce turnover, including suggested communication methods, valuable tools, and company resources, check out “Engaging and Communicating With Employees: Empower, Communicate, and Engage Your Employees with Access to Resources.” This e-book was authored by Community Health Charities Board Member and Continuwell President & CEO Charu Raheja.

Check out out our Tools For Engagement Guide for more ways to engage and inspire your employees.

3 CHALLENGES ON THE HORIZON FOR NONPROFITS 

Charitable giving is thriving at first glance—charities raised $410 billion in 2017. However, Chronicle of Philanthropy reporting indicates that this may be philanthropy’s peak due to limiting trends:

  1. The share of Americans who give to charity is declining.
  2. Giving has declined in all age groups—not only millennials.
  3. Nonprofits are increasingly relying on the wealthy.

Community Health Charities is working hard to support our nonprofit partners and make it easy for companies and their employees to build stronger, healthier communities. Check out our resources: workplace giving campaigns, in-office volunteering events, and engagement activities.

After 60 years, Community Health Charities recognized that we stood at a vital crossroads: evolve or become irrelevant.

The landscape of philanthropy has changed. Technology has advanced the transactional aspect of giving, as mobile, digital, social and online giving platforms replaced most in-person asks and paper pledge forms — and supplanted a large portion of our role as a workplace giving-centered organization.

As technology and donor demands continue to evolve, many nonprofits that were strong and successful in the past are now struggling and left with a particularly daunting decision: adapt or die.

Here are my top recommendations for how to make the switch from transactional to collaborative, helping your nonprofit remain relevant and increasing your impact into the future.

Avoid mission creep while making a mission shift.

 

Read the full article on Forbes.

 

If you’re measuring volunteer programs by their participation rate, you could actually be hurting company culture.

Reporting by Realized Worth shows volunteer programs that pressure employees to participate often backfire, leading to employees feeling coerced and obligated to participate.  This results in a company culture embedded in resentment.

The solution? Encourage employee volunteering and giving by finding leaders in your organization to model engagement: “When people see others, especially leaders, engage in [organizational citizenship behavior], they are likely to find voluntary expressions of mimicking such behavior.”

Read the full article on Realized Worth. Utilize our campaign resources to recognize employee champions in your workplace to model employee engagement. Check out our Volunteer On The Spot Guide for volunteer activities employees can get involved in right in the office.

If your small business is looking to incorporate workplace giving into your company’s culture, consider the following guidelines from BBB Wise Giving Alliance:

  • Verify the charities’ tax-exempt status.
  • Keep in mind state registration requirements for charities.
  • Be wary of excessive pressure.
  • Confirm the amount donated from benefit dinners and performance tickets.
  • Confirm with charities before establishing clothing bins and coin collection boxes.
  • Receive cause-related marketing disclosures before using a charities’ name in promotions.
  • See if the charity meets BBB Charity Standards.

Read the BBB Wise Giving Alliance article.

All of Community Health Charities’ more than 2,000 nonprofit partners have been approved by BBB Wise Giving Alliance and meet high standards of transparency and conduct, especially in workplace giving campaigns.  We work with many small and mid-size businesses establishing workplace giving campaigns, offering giving options, causes, volunteer opportunities, health resources, strategic partnerships, campaign resources, and more to help you engage your employees and customers while impacting communities. Contact us to learn more.

JEA, a publicly owned electric utility company, annually raises over $50,000 during their workplace giving campaign—peaking at $73,104 in 2014.

How do they do it? Passionate employees, an organizational culture of giving back, and following tried and true methods of employee engagement and workplace giving.

JEA’s 2018 campaign ran from April—June and was themed “Many Hands Doing What We Can To Help.” The campaign committee hosted a basketball tournament, charity walk, flag football tournament, and talent show to unite employees and excite them about giving back to the community. Community Health Charities also created personalized communications for JEA, including charity one-pagers, stories of impact, and sending charity speakers to JEA events.

“At JEA, we have approximately 35 different departments that hold their own CHC rallies. These rallies can range from 15 people to well over 100. When a speaker from a CHC charity attends and speaks of the difference their organization can make in the lives of someone who is worthy of the assistance, it makes that particular charity seem ‘real.’ We can put ourselves in that person or family’s situation and can appreciate the love, kindness, support and friendship of those who give so much of their time to help others in need.”—Tia Kalina, Administrative Support, Brandy Branch Generating Station

 

Check out the Giving And Engagement Case Study: JEA for proven methods on engaging employees, communicating with employees, setting up your campaign team, fundraising, and more.

 

Jerome Tennille, an employee engagement professional who specializes in volunteer management, recently presented “Corporate Social Responsibility – Making it Work for your Organization’s Volunteer Program” with candid recommendations for how companies and nonprofits can best align for mutual benefit.

5 Takeaways:

  1. Do your research first. Due diligence is critically important in understanding a company’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives. Some companies have specific causes they focus on, and others may more broadly support the community and giving back. Before asking for money or seeking volunteers, nonprofits must align with those corporate goals.  Doing research offers useful insights into a company’s core focus areas and demonstrates alignment (or not) with a nonprofit’s mission. “I get solicitations all the time from people who clearly have not done their research,” said Jerome. “Unfortunately, that is a waste of time for both sides.”2
  2. Focus on impact and authenticity. This applies to both sides of the partnership. It’s not authentic when a company comes at the last minute asking for large-scale employee engagement activities that a nonprofit has to create in a rush, diverting resources from their mission. It’s also not authentic when a nonprofit treats a company like an ATM machine and is only interested in money. “Don’t go for short-term gain and risk the long-term relationship,” cautioned Jerome. “A company is a business and has to be successful and make money before it can give it away.” The best corporate-nonprofit partnerships focus on building long-term relationships to achieve real impact, aligned with the company’s business goals and the nonprofit’s mission. Ultimately, the goal for both partners is to serve the community.
  3. Get creative. In his experience, 90% of companies are looking for a turnkey, single day of service for employee engagement. Rather than put pressure on nonprofits to provide volunteer activities for hundreds or thousands of employees on one day, Jerome suggests companies and nonprofits look for new and more meaningful ways to work together. Ensure any project meets a real community need and is mission-driven, not sacrificing program integrity. While at The Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS), when large companies with thousands of employees kept approaching him for ready-to-go volunteer projects, Jerome worked jointly with program managers to solve the challenge. They stayed true to TAPS’ core services and developed “Thousands of Thanks,” a volunteer program for employees to write or draw leaves and create beautiful thank you trees—a “forest of thanks”—that encouraged visiting families who were grieving the loss of a military loved one. This program has now expanded to custom quilts as well. “It took a lot of brainpower to get to that point,” Jerome said.
  4. Understand motivations: Employees might volunteer to help the cause, or to enhance their résumés, boost business reputation, or fulfill a company mandate. Nonprofits need to take the time to listen to a company and its employees’ motivations. Equally, nonprofits can work to educate companies, especially key leaders, on community needs and the costs involved in mission work and meaningful impact. For example, although most companies want to volunteer at a food bank during the holidays, the real need is during the off-months.
  5. Make it about mutual benefit. A company’s business goals and philanthropic strategy can align seamlessly with a nonprofit’s mission and work for both sides. For example, Jerome recommends nonprofits position volunteering as a solution to a business challenge—not just unpaid work that takes away company revenue. “Find a mutual benefit and position yourself to solve their problems,” Jerome advised “Help them reach their goals while not sacrificing yours.”

 

Jerome shared two examples that demonstrate how mutual benefit in corporate-nonprofit partnerships works.

  • The hospitality industry at large is working to eliminate food waste while serving communities in need. Similarly, many food banks, pantries, and distribution centers want to eliminate food waste and serve communities too. So, it’s not uncommon that companies that source high volumes of food want to donate what’s not used, plus, company volunteer can help sort this food in the food pantry’s warehouse, while also sourcing unique skills from their employees to develop best-in-class processes to more efficiently receive and distribute the food.
  • The entire hospitality industry is experiencing a staffing shortage. Volunteering can be a solution. Some companies in this industry provide job training, résumé writing, interview practice, mentorship, and more with a special focus on youth, diverse populations, women, people with disabilities, veterans, and refugees. Employees volunteer with these communities to provide employment skills, helping eliminate stereotypes and providing hope and a future for underserved groups. “Youth are four times more likely to choose a job if they are exposed to it early,” said Jerome. And by developing a talent pipeline for the hospitality industry, companies engaged in this type of volunteering position themselves to better meet a business need.

 

In the end, creating partnerships for mutual benefit is the only way to build long-term, sustainable relationships with maximum community impact.

 

 

Jerome Tennille is the Manager of Volunteerism for Marriott International, where he leads the company’s traditional and skills-based volunteer programs, ensuring they reflect the latest innovations, technologies, and best practices. This includes Marriott’s  global week and month of community service, providing the framework, resources, and support needed for volunteerism efforts to be executed both globally and locally.  Prior to joining Marriott International, Jerome held the position of Senior Manager of Impact Analysis and Assessment for Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS), a national organization that offers help, hope, and healing to all those grieving the death of a loved one serving in America’s armed forces. Jerome currently serves as a board of directors member of Peace Through Action USA and on the PsychArmor Institute Advisory Committee for the School of Volunteers & Nonprofits. Jerome holds a Bachelor of Applied Science in operations management and a Master of Sustainability Leadership (MSL) from Arizona State University. Jerome is designated as Certified in Volunteer Administration (CVA) and is also a veteran of the US Navy.

 

Liberty Diversified International (LDI), a Community Health Charities corporate partner, celebrated their 100 year anniversary celebration this July. The celebration consisted of a 19 day “Great Gratitude Tour,” where the organization gave back to 17 cities and boasted millions of dollars in giving. The bus tour began in New York, went as far as California, and concluded with a Grand Finale in Minnesota.

On Friday, July 20 the tour concluded with a Grand Finale that presented 15 LDI nonprofit partners with gratitude grants, including Community Health Charities and four of our nonprofit partners.  Beginning at 10:18 AM, LDI gave gratitude grants to each of the nonprofit partners every hour at the 18th minute; 18 signifies life in the Jewish faith.

We’re proud to be partners with an organization so focused on building stronger, healthier communities across the country.

Contact us and access our campaign resources to organize opportunities for your employees to support their communities.

 

EXPERTS FROM AMERICAN EXPRESS, THE COCA-COLA COMPANY, JOHNSON & JOHNSON, AND MORE SHARE ENGAGEMENT STRATEGIES

Thank you to everyone who attended the 17th Annual Charities@Work Employee Engagement Summit June 27-28, 2018. The preconference sold out and the Summit was packed. Participants joined distinguished presenters from American Express, Best Buy, The Coca-Cola Company, Campbell Soup Company, KPMG US, Johnson & Johnson, and more leading global companies to discuss engaging employees and driving greater social impact. Let us know if you would like access to event materials and presentations.

CORPORATE PARTNERS: OUR CORPORATE PORTAL LAUNCHED THIS WEEK

Community Health Charities appreciates your time and diligence in managing your organization’s workplace giving campaign. To help you, we have centralized support services for our corporate partners with our new corporate portal. Register to create your account.

Your account gives you access to update your workplace information and contacts, request nonprofit partner representation at campaign events, and review campaign reporting. We will continue to add features over time to enhance user experience and convenience.

INCREASE EMPLOYEE RETENTION BY PRIORITIZING CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

It’s no longer enough for organizations to exist and create a profit—employees are expecting organizations to make a positive impact.

75% of US workers expect their employer to support groups and individuals and need in their respective communities, either through donations and/or volunteer efforts, reported a Glassdoor Study.

Is your organization meeting industry standards?

Whether it’s your first time running a workplace giving campaign or you’re looking to increase participation, Community Health Charities has the resources to help you meet your goals and increase employee engagement.

BP EMPLOYEES TAKE 23 MILLION STEPS

BP ran a One Million Step Challenge where employees who hit the mark over the course of a year were eligible for deductions in their health plans. In one year, 23,000 employees took over 23 billion steps collectively.

For more ideas and resources to prioritize physical and mental health in your workplace, check out our Health and Wellness Guide .

CHALLENGES ON THE HORIZON FOR NONPROFITS AND HOW YOU CAN HELP

Charitable giving is thriving at first glance—charities raised $410 billion in 2017. However, Chronicle’s reporting indicates that this may be philanthropy’s peak due to limiting trends:

  1. The share of Americans who give to charity is declining.
  2. Giving has declined in all age groups—not only millennials.
  3. Nonprofits are increasingly relying on the wealthy.

Community Health Charities is working hard to support our nonprofit partners and make it easy for companies and their employees to build stronger, healthier communities. Check out our resources: workplace giving campaigns, on-site volunteering events, and engagement activities.

Employee engagement has never been more critical. Engaged employees are happier and 22% more productive (Harvard Business Review), yet most companies find employee engagement challenging. In fact, Gallup studies show 70% of U.S. workers are not engaged at work.

Every company has three types of employees: engaged, not engaged, or actively disengaged.

Engaged employees have a passion for the company and drive it forward, while actively disengaged staff often cost the company. For simple ways to enhance employee engagement and reduce turnover, including suggested communication methods, valuable tools, and company resources, check out “Engaging and Communicating with Employees: Empower, Communicate, and Engage Your Employees with Access to Resources.” This e-book was authored by Community Health Charities Board Member and Continuwell President & CEO Charu Raheja.

For more employee engagement resources, take a look at Community Health Charities’ Tools For Engagement GuideHealth and Wellness Guide, and Year-Round Employee Engagement Calendar.

 

Charu Raheja, PhD is the CEO of Continuwell & TriageLogic Group and has served on the Community Health Charities’ Board of Directors since 2015. Charu graduated with a PhD in Finance from New York University and her award-winning research and publications have influenced corporate governance policy and regulation.

Embrace a culture of employee empowerment in your workplace.

Employees who feel they are trusted and respected by leadership are more passionate about their work and are empowered to make a greater impact towards the organization’s mission.

“Ultimately, the real measure of empowering our people is impact. We didn’t invent a new and elaborate system of managing people. In fact, it’s quite the opposite – we stripped away policies and procedures to enable our team members to innovate, hold each other up, and solve problems. And when we’re doing that, the results come,” said Jamie Bearse, President & CEO of ZERO: The End of Prostate Cancer.

Employ this culture in your workplace with ZERO’s five guidelines:

  1. Don’t hire for knowledge; hire for passion.
  2. Articulate your mission and most important goals broadly across the organization.
  3. Build trust.
  4. Rip up the rule book.
  5. Embrace technology.

Read ZERO’s full article for more ways to maximize your employee’s impact. When you’re looking to employ a high-impact culture in your office, use Community Health Charities’ engagement tools to empower your team.

Charitable giving is thriving at first glance—charities raised $410 billion in 2017. However, Chronicle’s reporting indicates that this may be philanthropy’s peak due to limiting trends:

  1. The share of Americans who give to charity is declining.
  2. Giving has declined in all age groups—not only millennials.
  3. Nonprofits are increasingly relying on the wealthy.

Read the full Chronicle article.

Community Health Charities is working hard to support our nonprofit partners and make it easy for companies and their employees to build stronger, healthier communities. Check out our resources: workplace giving campaigns, on-site volunteering events, and engagement activities.

It’s no longer enough for organizations to exist and create a profit—employees are expecting organizations to make a positive impact.

Specifically, employees are expecting that their employers provide opportunities to give back to their communities:

  • Employee turnover drops by 57% when employees are deeply connected to their companies giving and volunteering efforts, according to a Benevity Engagement Study.
  • 75% of US workers expect their employer to support groups and individuals and need in their respective communities, either through donations and/or volunteer efforts, reported a Glassdoor Study—this means that employees are expecting in-office volunteer opportunities.

Is your organization meeting industry standards?

Whether it’s your first time running a workplace giving campaign or you’re looking to increase participation, Community Health Charities has the resources  to help you meet your goals and increase employee engagement:

  • The Campaign Coordinator Guide lists the five steps to running a successful campaign and includes all the resources you will need from planning to thanking.
  • The Goal Setting Guide helps you consider previous year’s data and calculate an attainable goal to motivate your team.
  • The Health and Wellness Guide promotes mental and physical health through fun and healthy incentives an can be tied to your campaign.
  • The Tools For Engagement Guide features fun incentives and activities to engage employees.
  • The Volunteer On The Spot Guide provides meaningful workplace experiences in the office with the organizations your employees support.
  • The Year-Round Employee Engagement Calendar helps you celebrate your employees’ efforts and raise awareness for health and wellness all year.

Health care costs increased for 79% of organizations between 2016 and 2017.

According to one study, organizations save $7 in healthcare costs for every dollar they invest in health programming.

Can your company afford to not prioritize health and wellness?.

Health and Wellness Programs improve and promote mental and physical health and allow employers to offer fun and healthy incentives for employees who participate. These programs improve and maintain the general health of employees.

According to Forbes, 77% of employees believe health and wellness programs positively impact the culture at work. The goal of a health and wellness program is to create a culture where employees choose to live a healthier lifestyle. Healthy behaviors lead to lower health risks, and lower health risks lead to fewer long-term health conditions. Changing behaviors can be hard. We have created the Health and Wellness Guide to help companies create and sustain healthy habits in and out of the workplace.

In the Health and Wellness Guide, you will find:

  1. Benefits of running a health and wellness campaign
  2. Tips for a successful campaign
  3. Pay and free (or very low-cost) program recommendations your company can implement that can have significant and positive health impacts on employees
  4. Incentives to keep your team motivated and excited about the healthy changes implemented
  5. Examples of companies who implemented health and wellness campaigns—and their results

Check out our Campaign Resources for more guides on creating a healthy workplace. Contact us at info@healthcharities.org for customized resources for your workplace.

CSR PROFESSIONALS, DON’T MISS OUT: JUNE 28 IN NYC

It’s your last chance to register for the 17th Annual Charities@Work Employee Engagement Summit, chaired by Community Health Charities.

Join leaders from American Express, Campbell Soup Company, the Coca-Cola Company, Johnson & Johnson and more to drive greater employee engagement and social impact. Don’t miss this opportunity to network with corporate leaders from across the country—the June 27 Preconference Peer-Learning Workshop is already SOLD OUT. Register now for the June 28 Employee Engagement Summit.

 

CORPORATE PARTNERS, WE’RE LAUNCHING A CORPORATE PORTAL NEXT MONTH

Community Health Charities values the time our corporate partners dedicate to building healthier communities and recognizes the importance of convenience in achieving our engagement goals. We are centralizing support services for our corporate partners by developing a campaign portal launching in mid-July. Within this new platform, campaign coordinators will have access to readily available resources specific to their company. Many features like the ability to update contact and profile information, access campaign tools and guides, request charity partner attendance at events, and view reporting will enhance our communications during every phase of the campaign process. Additional information coming soon to campaign coordinator email inboxes.

 

COMMUNITY HEALTH CHARITIES ELECTS OFFICERS TO LEAD NATIONAL BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Community Health Charities recently elected an impressive slate of incoming officers to lead the National Board and achieve the organization’s new mission to empower people to take action to improve health and wellbeing.

“I could not be more proud to serve alongside these visionary leaders,” said Cynthia Rolfe, national board chair, Community Health Charities. “Each officer brings career experience and personal commitment to health and well-being. All the board members are honored to help Community Health Charities ensure our partners can build healthier communities far into the future.”

National Board leadership includes: Cynthia Rolfe, Board Chair; Stephen Keith, MD, MSPH, Vice Chair; Kevin Clayton, Vice Chair; Linda G. Blount, Secretary; and Eric T. Jones, Treasurer.

 

JILLIAN NIESLEY AND ROMANA ROLNIAK JOIN COMMUNITY HEALTH CHARITIES NATIONAL BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Community Health Charities is thrilled to welcome two new board members: Jillian Nielsey, Senior Manager of Strategic Partnerships, Community Impact, Comcast Corporation, and Romana Rolniak, Communication Manager II at Walmart U.S. They’re joining an evolving team of corporate professionals and nonprofit executives working to build stronger, healthier communities.

 

STARTING A WORKPLACE GIVING CAMPAIGN? WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED

Whether it’s your first time running a workplace giving campaign or you’re looking to increase participation, our Campaign Coordinator Guide has everything you need from starting the campaign to announcing its success.

 

KICKSTART YOUR COMMUNITY IMPACT WITH GIVINGMATTERS365

Community Health Charities offers companies our own online giving platform, GivingMatters365, connecting your employees directly to the causes important to them through stories of impact, volunteer opportunities, goal updates and incentives, and more.
Protolabs has a commitment to making a difference in the areas in which we live and work. Partnering with Community Health Charities strengthens that commitment and provides a way for our employees to give back to local charities close to their hearts,” said Alex Sovell, an employee at Protolabs. “The giving platform [GivingMatters365], has provided an additional way to engage our employees in our Community Health Charities events. As a high-tech manufacturing company, we rely heavily on technology in our day-to-day and the platform is very user friendly for our employees.”

Learn more about Community Health Charities’ flexible solutions to engage employees, reach CSR goals, and build healthier communities.

 

COMMUNITY HEALTH CHARITIES PRESIDENT & CEO JOINS ZERO BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Thomas Bognanno, Community Health Charities President and CEO, has been elected to serve on the national board of directors for ZERO: The End of Prostate Cancer, a leading nonprofit with a mission to end prostate cancer.

“I am joining with ZERO to help them end prostate cancer. The fact is every 18 minutes another American dies from prostate cancer—that’s 29,430 deaths per year. That’s enough to fill a baseball stadium,” said Bognanno.

Thomas Bognanno is an advocate for men’s health, sharing his experience with prostate cancer to encourage men and families to prioritize their health.

 

HEAT UP YOUR EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT

Summer starts next week: How are you keeping your employees engaged during the summer months?

Change up your employee engagement program and take advantage of the warm weather: host a picnic during lunch, find outdoor volunteer opportunities, offer flexible hours on Friday afternoons, and prioritize your employees. Use our Tools For Engagement Guide and Year-Round Employee Engagement Calendar for more ideas to liven up your workplace this summer and our Health and Wellness Guide to keep your employees happy and healthy.

Pick a cause for employees to support that is relevant to summer months, such as KOA Care Camps, Camps For Kids With Diabetes, Camps For Kids With Health Challenges, and more  to help children facing long-term health challenges get the chance to be kids in a safe environment this summer.

I’ll never forget when my doctor started our conversation with “Man, you have a lot of cancer in there!”

I had considered myself healthy for a man over the age of 50. My diet was light on sugar and carbs, I had a regular exercise routine at the gym every week, I did not smoke, and my alcohol consumption was minimal—I thought I was on track to live to be 100! I even had my PSA (prostate specific antigen) tested every couple of years, but had been complacent and unworried about my own risk of cancer.

All of that complacency was shattered when I had the life-altering diagnosis of prostate cancer—a lot of prostate cancer. My life was suddenly consumed with appointments with urologists and radiologists; countless hours were spent on internet searches that yielded highly generic, and sometimes conflicting, information. I finally realized I needed to approach this as “my cancer.” I needed to make decisions based on my age, my lifestyle, my family, and, most importantly, the impact on my wife.

The good news is, prostate cancer is a treatable and manageable disease. Regardless of the stage of your disease, you have options for treatment. There are more than 2.9 million prostate cancer survivors in the U.S. The prognosis for survival is excellent, even if the cancer reoccurs. In my case, the cancer reoccurred three years after my prostatectomy (surgical removal of the prostate and surrounding affected tissues). Radiation treatments took care of the remaining metastatic disease and I am now almost at the coveted five-year survival rate with no signs of re-occurrence.

My message to men is that the opportunity for a long and productive life exists only when a man is proactive, prioritizes his health, and is vigilant on taking preventive measures.

June is Men’s Health Month, and Sunday, June 17 is Father’s Day. There is no better time of the year to focus on men’s health.

As a father and husband, let me suggest to spouses and family members that you skip buying dad another tie or grill mitt this Father’s Day. Instead, let him know you want him to be here for many more Father’s Days.

Here are 7 ways to give your dad the gift of health:

1) Ask dad to get the PSA test. The greatest risk factors for developing prostate cancer are increasing age, family history, ethnicity, and diet. If you can answer yes to any of these factors, get the test today. Don’t wait: I am older than 50, I have a family history of prostate cancer, or I am African-American.

2) Send dad a note, an e-card or a text encouraging him to schedule an annual check-up.

3) Commit to a healthier lifestyle. Keep each other accountable, and get the whole family involved.

4) Get your heart rates up. Take walks together; hike, play a friendly game of basketball, football or Frisbee; go golfing; or invite the grandkids to the park.

5) Eat dinner together. Find healthy alternatives at your favorite restaurants.

6) Give healthy gifts. If you do get dad a gift for Father’s Day, consider a game you can play together; a FitBit, health monitor, health app, or step counter; or a healthy treat or meal.

7) Support Men’s Health. Donate your time or money. Recently, I was elected to serve on the national board of directors for ZERO: The End of Prostate Cancer, the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. I am joining with them to help end prostate cancer. Find a nonprofit that works for a men’s health cause you’re passionate about.

There is nothing wrong with growing mustaches and raising awareness of men’s health issues for Movember. We need that ― but we also need men to take actionI did, and it has saved my life thus far. One in every nine men will have to face prostate cancer in their lifetime. That can be changed. The best way for any man to say, “I love you,” to his family and loved ones is to do his best to ensure that he is here for many Father’s Days to come.

What’s your organization’s purpose?

No, not profitability or outcomes, but the social or environmental impact your organization prioritizes. Consumers no longer are solely focusing on products and services—they’re focusing on the intentions and actions of organizations as well. A 2018 Cone Communications Study found that “companies that lead with Purpose will stand to build deeper bonds with existing consumers, expand the consumer base and enlist those brand advocates to share the brand message.”

The study found that:

  • 78% of Americans believe that companies must positively impact society
  • 77% feel a stronger emotional bond to purpose-driven companies
  • 66% would use products from a purpose-driven company than a non-purpose driven companies

Read Cone Communication’s full purpose study: How To Build Deeper Bonds, Amplify Your Message And Expand Customer Base.

When you’re looking to add purpose to your organization, utilize Community Health Charities’ extensive resource library, engagement tools to get your full team on board, and cause marketing solutions to involve your community.

Each year, more than 14 million children attend summer camp in the US. It’s a rite of passage for many, providing independence and personal growth. For children facing long-term health challenges, this life-changing opportunity builds confidence and helps children see beyond their limits rather than be defined by them.

BBB Wise Giving Alliance has provided four guidelines for supporting philanthropy camps—ensuring that your support is giving kids the chance to be kids, despite health challenges:

  • Search for specialization
  • Find qualifications
  • Ensure camps are licensed
  • See if they are trustworthy

Community Health Charities’ Camps For Kids cause supports BBB-accredited nonprofit partners working to give children in need a happy, healthy summer.

Whether you’re improving an existing employee engagement program or developing a new one, you know that there are countless “proven” strategies out there—Realized Worth makes it easy to know which ones are effective.

Realized Worth has compiled the top trends and mechanisms in employee engagement and corporate social responsibility. Utilize them when improving your company’s culture, and reference our Year-Round Employee Engagement Calendar and Tools For Engagement Guide when implementing.

Read the full Realized Worth article.

 

 

There are 20.4 million veterans in the United States as of 2016—how many of them are in your community?

This Memorial Day, support the members of your community that fought for you, your family, and all of us.

  • Volunteer your time. Host an at-home volunteer event using our Volunteer On The Spot Guide. Whether your team is assembling care packages or writing thank you cards, they will be making an impact on local veterans. Or, use the volunteer opportunity locator to find existing projects in your area.
  • Support Hero’s Health. After sacrificing and serving our country, our military veterans often need to recover from both physical and mental wounds. Nearly 1 of every 4 active duty military members show signs of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression or other mental health conditions. Support Hero’s Health to provide comprehensive health services for our nation’s military, veterans, and first responders.
  • Thank veterans and their families. Stop and say thank you to any veterans you know, whether they’re family or community members.

Should Starbucks have an open bathroom policy? Should Amazon support DACA? How should businesses respond to #MeToo?In today’s world, social issues matter. They are on the front page of every newspaper and social media site. Your employees are taking action and expect their company to as well.

  • 75% of US workers between the ages of 18 and 34 expect their employer to take positions on social issues affecting the country, such as civil rights, immigration, and climate change.
  • 84% of US workers believe companies have an important voice in proposed legislation, regulation, and executive orders that could affect the employer’s business or the lives of employees.
  • 75% of US workers expect their employer to support groups and individuals and need in their respective communities, either through donations and/or volunteer efforts.

If employee activism is a hot topic for you, then you won’t want to miss this year’s Employee Engagement Summit in NYC. Andrew Davis, Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer at Coca-Cola, will talk about Tackling Today’s Social Issues and Igniting Employee Activism. A hands-on workshop Connecting Social Issues and Employee Activism with your Brand hosted by Best Buy will follow.

Register now for the 17th Annual Employee Engagement Summit June 27-28, 2018 to leverage employee activism in your business goals.

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) isn’t just good for your community—it’s good for your bottom line as well.

Incorporating CSR is good business:

  • Stakeholders want transparency
  • Mission-driven businesses get more press
  • Employees are driven by purpose

Read the full article on Forbes. Then, connect with us to create strategic partnerships with nonprofits, utilize our online flexible giving platforms, find volunteer opportunities, and create a customized program based on your CSR objectives and business goals.

CSR PROFESSIONALS: YOU’RE INVITED TO NEW YORK CITY THIS JUNE

Join us in New York June 27-28, 2018 for the 17th Annual Charities@Work Employee Engagement Summit.  The summit will explore challenges and opportunities facing CSR professionals, including igniting employee activism,  increasing employee activism through NGO partnerships, leveraging CSR marketing channels to demonstrate impact, aligning employee engagement and corporate purpose, and more. Speakers include CSR experts from American Express, Best Buy, Campbell’s Soup, and more.

Early bird registration  has been extended: Register by May 21, 2018 to save $100 with the code EARLYBIRD2018.

MAKE THIS YEAR’S WORKPLACE GIVING CAMPAIGN THE MOST SUCCESSFUL ONE YET

Looking to make this year’s workplace giving campaign the most successful one yet? Set a goal! Giving your employees a tangible goal is critical to motivating and inspiring your team. Our Goal Setting Guide helps you every step of the way, starting with realistic objectives, incorporating last year’s results, participation, and more. After you’ve set your goals, use our Tools For Engagement Guide to get your team excited about the upcoming campaign.

DONAN EMPLOYEES EMBRACE GIVINGMATTERS365

Donan knows the importance of offering employees choice and a chance to give back to their communities.

Donan offers employees Community Health Charities’ GivingMatters365 portal , an easy-to-use online giving portal, to support any nonprofit or cause important to them. This freedom has proven effective: The campaign raised an average of $25,000 annually since partnering with Community Health Charities, peaking in 2017 at $35,000.

“The support of the GivingMatters team has rocketed the success of our campaign! The amount of attention and guidance they provide is top of the line,” said Heather Fuqua, Human Resource Generalist at Donan.

Read Donan‘s full story and see how other Community Health Charities company partners are engaging their employees.

STAND WITH OUR VETERANS THIS MEMORIAL DAY

There are 21.8 million veterans in the United States.

That’s 21.8 million friends, family members, partners, and coworkers who risked their lives for us. After sacrificing and serving our country, many military veterans need to recover from both physical and mental wounds. Nearly 1 of every 4 active duty military members show signs of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, or other mental health conditions.

They fought for us. Now let’s fight for them.

This Memorial Day, volunteer to support veterans and their families; host in-office opportunities to thank veterans for their service; share health resources for military and veterans; and support Hero’s Health.

MENTAL HEALTH MATTERS THIS MAY

Mental health affects everyone. Whether your loved one is living with a diagnosis or you’re struggling to manage daily stress, mental health is vital to your wellbeing. Prioritize mental health beginning with Mental Health Month: Share mental health resources. Support Mental Health and Wellbeing. Start employee engagement strategies in your office to minimize workplace stress; continue the trend of wellness all year with the Year-Round Employee Engagement Calendar.

It has been more than one hundred years since President Woodward Wilson proclaimed Mother’s Day as a national celebration. Long before that, however, President Abraham Lincoln said, “All that I am or ever hope to be, I owe to my angel mother.”

Like the lengthening and warmer days of spring, another Mother’s Day is fast approaching. Serving breakfast in bed is truly a Mother’s Day classic. A bright bouquet of flowers and the expected card from the family are other time-honored traditions. There are countless other ways to convey the love and appreciation deserved by all mothers everywhere.

This year, however, I would like to suggest a new tradition, one that will be much more meaningful and long lasting: The gift of health and wellness. Heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases are among the leading causes of death for women in the United States—and the most preventable.

Make health something you and mom do together with a few easy ideas you can start, just in time for the big day this Sunday.

· Take morning walks through the neighborhood. On Mother’s Day and at other gatherings, take a family walk to the park or playground.

· Make meals healthy. Grocery shop together and prepare healthy meals with seasonal fruits and vegetables. Consider creating healthier versions of your family’s favorite recipes or having the kids cook a special meal for mom. Start a small family garden.

· Give healthy gifts. If you do get Mom a gift, try a bowl or basket of fresh fruit, a fruit bouquet, or step counters for her and the whole family.

· Get regular check-ups, and keep each other accountable.

· Support women’s health. Donate to a nonprofit to support mothers and children, especially those disproportionately affected due to their economic status, race or ethnicity, and other factors outside their control—check our cause list for ideas. Volunteer your time. Donate your gently used clothing and household items to local organizations. Your whole family can participate (Mom included), or you can let Mom know you are taking action in her honor.

These simple tips can help make health and wellness a natural part of your family’s routine. Best of all, getting active and giving back increase happiness and boost mental health, so you can help others while improving your own health too.

Celebrate Mother’s Day this year by giving Mom—and the whole family—a gift that will last a lifetime: better health for all.

Utilize our health resources, opportunities to support women’s health, women’s health information, volunteer opportunities, and more to give mom the gift of health this Mother’s Day. 

This blog was originally published on BBB Wise Giving Alliance, our partner.When considering the value of implementing a volunteer program into your employee engagement and corporate social responsibility strategies, keep in mind the monetary value of volunteering. 

The history of volunteering in the U.S. is a long and generous one from helping out neighbors in barn raising two centuries ago to Habitat for Humanity and similar charities building homes today. And, of course, volunteering is not just about building structures but can address everything from delivering meals to the elderly to educating children. While the personal benefits and joys of providing this assistance are very real for participants, it can be difficult to quantify. There is, however, an estimated dollar value of a volunteer hour. This past week, Independent Sector, the national nonprofit membership organization, in conjunction with IMPLAN, a provider of economic impact analysis software, announced that the value of the volunteer hour in the United States is $24.69 per hour which is up 2.2 percent from the previous year.

As further noted by Independent Sector, 63 million Americans volunteer about 8 billion hours to a variety of charitable organizations. IS also produced a state-by-state chart of volunteer data that is available here.

BBB Wise Giving Alliance encourages potential volunteers to find out more about the charity before volunteering and visit Give.org to verify if the subject charity meets the BBB Standards for Charity Accountability. In addition, we offer the following tips:

  • Consider what the charity expects of its volunteers.
  • Are you seeking a one-day offer of assistance or a continuing arrangement with the subject organization?
  • Keep in mind that the IRS does not allow you to deduct the value of your time as a donation, but travel expense such as gas and other incidental expenses might be deductible.
  • Charities can use volunteers in a variety of ways depending on the skills of the individuals providing assistance. Be aware that many charities need help with office work so don’t expect all volunteering is about delivering services to the needy.

Volunteers are usually welcomed throughout the year, so don’t wait until the holiday giving season before offering a helping hand.

When planning your organization’s volunteer program, check out our volunteer opportunity locator to find opportunities by keyword and zip code and our Volunteer On The Spot Guide to organize in-office volunteer events. 

If you aren’t measuring employee engagement, you should be. Skeptics complain that the data from employee engagement surveys isn’t fully trustworthy; any time you survey people, you have to look with a very cynical eye at the wording of the questions and whether the people surveyed believe their answers are truly confidential.

If you run employee-focused programs, however, it’s worth the effort to get to a trustworthy data set for employee engagement.

When I was at Wells Fargo, I worked with HR to correlate my volunteer and giving program usage with employee engagement data, which at that time was considered trustworthy. Through this, I learned a number of interesting things that helped me make a business case for investment in my programs. Among the things we learned:

  • Employees who donate or volunteer consistently return higher engagement scores.
  • Employees who volunteer with company-run events feel more a part of the team and think more highly of their coworkers.
  • Usage of the matching gift program did not correlate with higher or lower engagement, and in fact
  • Employees who were perpetually disengaged (low scores over a three year period) got the highest average donation match.

Furthermore, we went beyond combining basic program usage with engagement data; we cross-referenced program satisfaction surveys, and, in some business areas where management agreed to the research, we included productivity and profitability measures. We learned a number of important things from that research, but two things stood out to me:

  • Employees tend to follow their leader—if their leader volunteers and donates, employees in the workgroup tend to do so as well, and
  • Workgroups with high volunteerism and donor rates on average showed slightly lower short term profitability but had higher engagement, lower turnover, and better retention over time.

Obviously, your success may vary because every organization is different. It’s important to measure engagement, however, because until you have data that supports or refutes your beliefs, you’re just another person with an opinion. Once you have the data, you can investigate its meaning and decide whether you need to adjust your programs, change your approach, or keep your course steady.

 

Have you uncovered interesting or unexpected trends in your engagement and community involvement data? You can tell me, and pick up tips from leading practitioners, at the Charities@Work conference in New York, June 27-28.

Peter Dudley is an author and nationally recognized expert in corporate social responsibility, marketing, and employee engagement. He’s worked the last 17 years in CSR running employee giving and volunteerism for Wells Fargo, where his workplace campaign was ranked #1 nine years in a row by United Way Worldwide. Before joining Wells Fargo, Peter held various roles in high tech startups, from Marketing Director to software development to community management.

Peter is honored to serve on the Community Health Charities national board of directors as well as the Charities@Work Corporate Advisory Council, which he chaired in 2015 and 2016. He has also served on and chaired United Way Worldwide’s Global Corporate Leadership Council.

Peter lives in the San Francisco Bay Area and is the proud father of both an Eagle Scout and a transgender daughter.