Community Health Charities proudly pledged to support #OperationPrevention, in partnership with Milken Institute, Drug Enforcement Administration and Discovery Education to combat opioid misuse in schools, homes, and communities nationwide. The no-cost program offers resources for students, teachers, and parents to combat and prevent addiction. Pledge to spread awareness today.

Take action:  Check out Community Health Charities’ addiction  resources, read one doctor’s take on the opioid crisis, establish a Give Now page or giving campaign to help, and support the work of our charity partners fighting to end addiction: Hazelden Betty Ford FoundationThe National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, and Shatterproof.

This year, don’t make your resolutions about cutting back—make them about giving back.

  • Give yourself mental and physical health. This year, prioritize mental and physical wellbeing. 77% of U.S. workers suffer from at least one long-term health condition, from cancer to diabetes. Take time every day to focus on de-stressing and physically moving, whether you’re doing a crossword puzzle, taking a walk, or making a healthy dinner for your family. Give your employees the same gift of wellness by educating employees and offering our health resources.
  • Give your time. No matter where you live, your community needs your help. Set aside time in 2018 to volunteer. Use our volunteer opportunity locator tool to find organizations in your area supporting the causes you care about. If you’re looking to volunteer with your office, utilize our Volunteer On The Spot guide to make a difference during the workday.
  • Give your support. Congress recently passed a tax bill reducing taxes for the majority of Americans. While this is good news for many, doubling the standard deduction means fewer people will itemize charitable deductions on their taxes and is estimated to cost charities $12 to 20 billion annually. This year, if you saved on your taxes, consider giving back by eating locally or donating financially. Offer your team giving options including Give Now pages or a workplace giving campaign, featuring our causes and over 2,000 trusted charity partners.

New Year, stronger, healthier communities.

Research shows that 70% of all U.S. employees would be more loyal to a company that helps them contribute to social and environmental issues. Plus, our proprietary research shows that 85% of consumers prefer to give to local charities, making a difference right where they live and work.

Maximize your employee’s potential by maximizing the impact they can have on their communities; it worked for Elkay Manufacturing.

Elkay Manufacturing has nearly doubled their workplace giving campaign since 2014, raising over $107,000 in 2017—a nearly 25% increase from their 2016 campaign.  The secret? Providing ways for their employees to support the causes important to them. Community Health Charities provided Elkay manufacturing with charities relevant to the causes employees cared about both locally to company headquarters in Chicago, Illinois, and nationally. The company matched pledges, making it easier for employees to have a large impact—and 49.4% of employees did.

“The ease and efficiency allows employees to support charities important to them from East to West coast,” said Elkay’s Linda Carlisle of Corporate Communications. “Instead of writing hundreds of checks, we write one check annually and Community Health Charities disperses it.”

To create a personalized campaign like Elkay Manufacturing did, utilize the Community Health Charities’ survey (this is a sample; we’ll customize one for you) to find the issues important to your employees. Then, work with a Community Health Charities representative to create a custom cause for your organization.

Workplace giving isn’t solely about meeting CSR or company goals—it’s engaging employees by helping them give back to their communities.

SFM Mutual Insurance knows this first hand. For their second annual giving campaign with Community Health Charities, the company focused on giving employees the opportunity to work hands-on with the charity partners they support.

Employees gathered in the office to pin teal ribbons to awareness cards for the Minnesota Ovarian Cancer Alliance, helping the charity spread awareness and resources throughout the year. National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) giving tree was set up in the office’s lobby, with ornaments featuring wish list items for people hospitalized during the holiday season. Employees created glurch, a toy slime, for Fraser and the children and individuals it supports. The office also sponsored a family of seven living with cancer: In exchange for a $20 gift of support for the Angel Foundation, employees were permitted to dress down from the usual business casual to casual clothing for a week.

SFM Mutual Insurance’s engagement strategy works—the previous year’s campaign raised over $13,000.

Take a page out of SFM Mutual Insurance’s book—or our Volunteer on the Spot Toolkit—for your next campaign. Check out our volunteer opportunity locator  to find charities in your area that need your help, and contact info@healthcharities.org to set up a workplace giving campaign of your own

                                                                

This year-end giving season is unlike any other.

Annually, 31% of giving occurs during DecemberHowever, this year, donors are already fatigued. Hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, and wildfires caused over $15 billion in damage as of October. Puerto Ricans have been living without full power since Hurricane Maria hit the island in September. Wildfires took the lives of 42 people, injured 7,700, and burned over 8,400 homes and buildings. Hurricane Harvey flooded Texas, dumping 27 trillion gallons of rain and leaving an estimated 30,000 people needing temporary shelter. As if that weren’t enough, violent tragedies in Las Vegas and Sutherland Springs rocked the nation.

As is tradition, Americans rise up and come together to support those in need, with an outpouring of generosity to rebuild lives and communities.

Meanwhile, the House and Senate are working to pass a bill that could have devastating effects on the number of Americans eligible to write off charitable giving as a tax deduction. Of highest concern is doubling the standard deduction limit currently in place for taxpayers. According to IRS data, this would remove the tax incentive for an estimated $95 billion of annual charitable giving and reduce the number of itemizers from one-third of Americans to about five percent. This could reduce charitable giving by as much as$20 billion.

With all the needs in our country (and world), we can’t afford to lose billions in charitable giving. Now is the time to support the causes that matter most to you.

Read more on The Huffington Post.

Community Health Charities urges all nonprofits across the nation to alert their constituencies to help turn the tide on what could be some very serious and unintended consequences—charities are expected to lose billions of dollars in charitable donations—if the current versions of the Senate and House tax reform bills pass without changes we urgently seek.

We need all Community Health Charities’ charity partners, supporters, and friends to join the thousands of other nonprofits in contacting your elected officials and urging them to protect charitable giving in the Senate tax reform bill. Doubling the standard deduction will eliminate the charitable deduction for 95% of Americans. The result? An estimated $12-20 billion lost in charitable giving. Ask your senator to avoid this devastating consequence by expanding the charitable deduction to all Americans with the Universal Charitable Giving Act.

The House took up and passed its tax bill on Thursday.  The Senate sent a tax bill out of the Finance Committee on Thursday as well. We expect it to go to the floor the week after Thanksgiving. However, it has been a case of “good news” and “bad news” so far.

As of this writing, both the House and Senate raised the limits on how much taxpayers can give from 50 to 60% of their adjusted gross income.  That is good.  In the not-so-good category, neither the House nor the Senate have embraced a universal charitable deduction to preserve the value of the charitable deduction.

The details of the proposed legislation:

What is the same?

Both the Senate and House bills share some of the same provisions:

  • Doubled standard deduction and preservation of the charitable deduction.
  • Increased AGI limits for the charitable deduction for cash gifts from 50% to 60% (Senate sunset after 12/31/2025).
  • Elimination of the Pease limitation (Senate sunset after 12/31/2025).
  • A 1.4% excise tax on investment income of private colleges and universities, and organizations formally related to the institution, with assets valued of at least $250,000 per full-time student.
  • Doubled estate tax and generation-skipping tax exemption to $10 million (Senate sunset after 12/31/2025).
  • A 20% excise tax on executive compensation over $1 million at tax-exempt organizations.

What is different?

There are some key differences. The House version also includes:

  • Streamlined private foundation excise tax to 1.4%.
  • Requirement that donor-advised fund sponsoring organizations disclose inactive fund policies, as well as average amount of grants made from their DAFs.
  • Estate tax and generation-skipping tax repeal after six years.
  • Repeal of the Johnson Amendment, effectively allowing all 501(c)(3) organizations to engage in political speech in the ordinary course of the organization’s business (Sunset after five years).

What comes next:  

Now, the Senate Finance Committee will have to write legislative text based on the provisions that passed on Thursday. The Senate is expected to bring the bill to the floor for a vote the week of November 27, and thereafter the two chambers will have to come to an agreement before the final bill can be sent to the President’s desk. There are many differences between the Senate and House versions, so we expect a lot of change and compromise in the negotiation process.

The problem

During the debate in the Senate Finance Committee, Senators Stabenow (D-MI) and Wyden (D-OR) offered an amendment that would create an above-the-line charitable deduction for non-itemizers with an AGI cap of 60% and a phase-out for high-income taxpayers, similar to the Pease limitation. After Republicans argued that they are maintaining the charitable deduction in tax reform, and claimed that you can only create this policy if you decide not to double the standard deduction, the provision failed on a party-line vote of 14 nays to 12 yeas.

Although both were listed with the original amendments, Senator Thune (R-SD) did not offer the CHARITY Act as an amendment or the extended carryforward rule. The CHARITY Act would streamline the PF excise tax to 1%, expand the IRA charitable rollover to include distributions to donor-advised funds, and declare a sense of the Senate that the scope and value of the charitable deduction should not be diminished in comprehensive tax reform, among other provisions. The extended carryforward rule would make the charitable carryforward window 15 years instead of the 5 year window under current law.

Tax Policy Center and JCT Analyses

New research from the Tax Policy Center (TPC) tells us charitable giving will be affected by the House tax reform bill, and it’s mostly what we already knew. TPC estimates that H.R. 1 could reduce charitable giving by between $12 billion and $20 billion in 2018. In addition, while TPC has yet to publish research on the Senate version, it is likely safe to assume the findings would be similar.

This research is remarkably consistent with a study released earlier this year from the Indiana University (IU) Lilly Family School of Philanthropy that found the proposals considered in the Republican tax reform plan – such as expanding the standard deduction – could reduce charitable giving by as much as $13 billion. The drop in giving comes as a result of reducing the number of those who itemize to just 5% of Americans, which the Joint Committee on Taxation (JCT) confirmed last week would lead to a reduction of $95 billion being claimed as charitable deductions.

The evidence is now stacking up – the unintended consequence of current tax reform policies under consideration is a reduction in charitable giving.

Universal Charitable Giving Act

As you know, charities have rallied behind a universal charitable deduction as a way to protect against the consequences of an expanded standard deduction. Fortunately, there are options for lawmakers to consider. Just this week on Tuesday, November 14, Senator James Lankford (R-OK) introduced the Senate companion to the Universal Charitable Giving Act, which was originally introduced by Rep. Mark Walker (R-NC) in the House in October. As you may recall, the bill would extend an above-the-line charitable deduction to non-itemizers that would be capped at one-third of the standard deduction. So, although nothing was included in the Senate tax package that would ensure more Americans have access to a tax benefit for charitable giving, Senator Lankford’s universal charitable a deduction bill can still be considered by the full Senate, and perhaps even included in their final tax reform bill.

What needs to be done:

Ask your constituencies to contact their senators – and specifically Senator James Lankford (R-OK)— and urge them to protect charitable giving in the Senate tax reform bill. They need to understand that the charitable deduction, in the current iteration, is not being protected.  Again, have your supporters explain how doubling of the standard deduction will eliminate the charitable deduction for 95% of Americans and result in a loss of $12-20 billion in charitable giving. Tell your senator that the way to avoid this devastating consequence is to expand the charitable deduction to all Americans.

Even though the House has already passed its version of tax reform, have them contact their representative and relay the same information. The House and Senate versions of tax reform still need to be reconciled and your elected officials need to understand what the current proposals will do to charitable giving.

Keep in mind that all elected officials will be in their home states and districts this upcoming Thanksgiving week. More than ever before, now is the time for your organization to rally the troops and tell our elected representatives how tax reform will affect your charities and community.

Looking to donate to a cause close to your heart? This #GivingTuesday—November 28, 2017— follow these three steps for a chance to win $500 to donate to your favorite charity from our charity partners.

  • Take a #HealthySelfie that shows you doing something to improve health — it could be eating a healthy snack, using our health resources, hitting the gym, volunteering or giving to make your community healthier, or just taking a break for your mental health.
  • Share your #HealthySelfie on social media. Entries submitted via Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram will have a chance to win.
  • Tag @HealthCharities, #GivingTuesday, and #HealthySelfie in your submission.

A different winner will be chosen on each platform, based on engagement (so encourage your friends to favorite/like your post). The winner of the Twitter competition will be able to direct $500 to a charity partner of their choice; winners on Instagram and Facebook will be able to direct $250. See list of eligible charities. Be sure to enter only pictures that you have a right to share and post. Thanks to a generous donor for sponsoring this campaign.

Submission deadline is November 28 11:59 PM ET. Engagements are due November 29 9:00 AM ET.

This #GivingTuesday, we’re working to build stronger, healthier communities. Join us for #HealthySelfie and check out six more ways to give this year.

 

As the holidays and giving season approach, it’s a great time to start thinking of ways to give back to your community and the causes important to you.

This year, join us for #GivingTuesday – a national movement focused on charity on the first Tuesday after Black Friday and Cyber Monday — and help build stronger, healthier communities.

Here are six ways to give back:

  • Volunteer your time. Our volunteer locator tool helps you find opportunities by zip code or keyword.
  • Support your favorite health cause. Our causes make it easy to support the issues close to your heart—whether it’s children, veterans, women’s health, or disasters. Pick one or create your own custom cause.
  • Share your #HealthySelfie. Follow three simple steps for a chance to win $500 to direct to your favorite charity from our charity partners.
  • Start a workplace giving campaign or create a custom Give Now page. It’s easier than ever to give back to the causes you care about at work with our GivingMatters365 platform or Give Now. These flexible tools are simple to use, plus we offer turnkey campaign materials and resources, and handle the set-up and processing of your campaign.
  • Show some love with the Combined Federal Campaign. If you’re a federal or military employee, you’re eligible to give to the 2017 Combined Federal Campaign. Community Health Charities is one of the campaign’s oldest and largest partners, distributing millions of public sector contributions. Join us this year and support the Combined Federal Campaign to defeat cancer, fight the deadliest diseases, and save lives.
  • Raise awareness and share critical health resources.

Giving Tuesday is November 28 this year, but giving back isn’t limited to one day. Together, we can build stronger, healthier communities all year long.

To keep employees engaged, Northern Tool hosted an event every single day of their two-week giving campaign.  It’s the fourth annual campaign with Community Health Charities. The events centered on giving back to the community, and included impact speakers and volunteer activities benefiting partner charities. However, supporting the community doesn’t always have to be serious. The more lighthearted events included human bowling with tennis balls, candy grams, and birdhouse building for a charity partner.  Northern Tool hosted a “thank you” breakfast on the last day of the campaign to show appreciation for employee participation.

In addition to the daily events, Northern Tools’ team sent an email every morning updating employees on campaign progress and upcoming events. A fundraising thermometer in the lobby reminded employees of the progress they had made toward their goal, as well as the work that still needed to be done.  The owners of Northern Tool generously matched employee donations, as they have each year.

Northern Tool’s community focus doesn’t end with the annual giving campaign—it lasts all year. The company consistently provides outlets for its employees to work with the causes they care about. For example, full-time staff at Northern Tool  are given a paid day off every year to volunteer with a charity of their choice, plus the company hosts holiday drives to collect toys and donations for local charities and shelters.

“It was the first time I was ever hooked to something and would get sick from not using. Then they took away my prescription. I ended up selling all my valuable stuff to buy pills on the streets. Forget some of my obligations. I hated who I had become.”

Jerry Chappell is one of the two million Americans living the nightmare of addiction to prescription pain medications. His story is not only compelling, but all too familiar to those of us who work in addiction medicine.

Addiction to prescription pain medications and heroin is not a new phenomenon. In 2008, I developed and ran an opioid use disorder clinic out of my outpatient practice in rural West Virginia. Although death by overdose was not considered a national epidemic or a political hot topic for the media, my neighbors, colleagues, friends’ parents, and many of the people living in the Ohio Valley were suffering and dying from their addictions.

The two years of engaging patients in a comprehensive medical/behavioral treatment plan, encouraging their participation in peer and community sober support systems, and watching them meet their recovery goals were the most rewarding years of my clinical practice. During these years, I learned that patients can manage their chronic disease when they are managed by qualified physicians, provided with evidence-based medicine, and administered proper medication-assisted treatments (MAT) and urine drug screens (UDS).  In 2010, I closed my practice and took a position in managed care.

The following two years were the most somber and frustrating in my professional career. At first I wondered, “Why are few of my colleagues experiencing the same feelings of reward and accomplishment that I had treating those suffering from addiction? Why are people still dying of overdose?” Then, I started receiving the not-so-infrequent calls, texts, and photos from my medical assistant back in West Virginia. Sometimes she would send snapshots of the latest evening news from her television screen. One after another were sad stories of previous patients having relapsed, been arrested, overdosed, or died. Even while writing this, I am haunted by feelings of guilt and questions of “What if I had stayed? Would they still be alive had I not left them?”

A great deal of my career since then has been dedicated to promoting quality care and services for those with Opioid Use Disorder. Over the last six years, those of us in the payer, or insurance coverage, industry have seen a “perfect storm” of events giving rise to the epidemic we see today. More potent pain medications have been manufactured and sales continue to rise. Increased utilization and demand for addiction services have quickly overwhelmed a system with few addiction specialists. A lack of industry-wide standards have resulted in extreme variance in treatment modalities.

These factors are not the primary reason that the opioid epidemic has received national attention: The face of opioid addiction has changed. Although still in existence, images of the poor, minorities, derelicts, and those on the fringe of society have been replaced by images of the rich, famous, young, and white. Methadone clinics have been replaced by posh destination facilities offering personal training, yoga, seaside views, and five-star culinary. Scholarships and graduation certificates replace the guarantee of transparency, outcomes, and results. An emphasis on “access to care” outweighs the demand for quality.

Fortunately, addiction medicine is now recognized as a medical specialty: research and clinical experience have resulted in standards of care, clinical guidelines, and evidence-based practice. The challenge now is combatting a billion dollar industry beholden to old, ineffective treatment practices, and replacing them with medicine-based and data-driven treatment models like we have for every other epidemic we have faced in modern times.

Perhaps one day the norm will be stories of people getting their lives back, year-over-year decrease in death by overdose, and practices based on science, research, and evidenced-based medicine. Hopefully we all will feel the sense of reward and hope that I did over a decade ago while practicing in rural America.

If you or a loved one are struggling with addiction, utilize Community Health Charities’ opioid and addiction health resources for response toolkits, intervention guidelines, risk factors, and more. To learn more, utilize our charity partners’ additional resources: Shatterproof, Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation, and National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence.

About Dr. James

Dr. Frank James earned his law and medical degrees at Southern Illinois University. He is board certified in General, Child and Adolescent and Forensic Psychiatry as well as Addiction Medicine.

Dr. James spent his clinical years providing inpatient and outpatient psychiatric services in underserved areas in the Ohio Valley. He developed a specialty outpatient clinic for opioid use disorder (OUD). His treatment model focused on the integration of group therapy and psychotropic medication management with the use of urine drug screens (UDS) and medication-assisted treatment (MAT).

For the last seven years, Dr. James has worked in managed care. He provides large behavioral health organizations guidance in drafting evidenced-based benefit guidelines specific to OUD treatment and service, including level of care determination, MAT prior authorizations, and UDS coverage determination. His current focus is medical/behavioral integration and alternative payment model development for substance use disorder services.

Dr. James is a member of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) Finance Committee and Policy Committee. He is the vice chair of ASAM’s Payer Relations Committee, and alternate to ASAM’s board of directors for Region III.

Together, we don’t just give—we celebrate!

Community Health Charities company partner Medica’s 2017 “Together We” giving campaign didn’t just focus on fundraising. Instead, it focused on uniting the Medica community around a single cause:  Together we can make a difference.

The campaign kicked off with a picnic with over 900 Medica employees. The picnic lunch was emceed by “Medtallica,” a band comprised of Medica employees. When the bass player unexpectedly wasn’t able to attend, a board member stepped up and jammed impromptu with the band.

The rest of the campaign was filled with events to keep spirits high, including a community showcase, raffles for parking spots, candy grams, service day projects, and a silent auction.

The campaign ended with canoe races where the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners received a check to donate to their charity of choice, executives singing karaoke and a celebration of everything the Medica team did for their community, both volunteering and fundraising. Employees tied 20 blankets for a local charity partner, created 375 detergent packets, collected 500 bracelet kits for children in hospitals, and raised over $370,000 for charity partners.

Looking to host a giving celebration like Medica? Use our Volunteering on the Spot toolkit to find easy volunteer activities, like Medica’s tie-blankets, to engage your employees and build stronger, healthier communities.

Out of an estimated 18.5 million military veterans in the United States, four million are living with a service-connected disability. One in four military members show signs of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, or other mental health condition.

They’ve sacrificed and served our country. They fought for us. Now it’s time to fight for them.

In the week leading up to Veteran’s Day, let’s show our thanks to our nation’s military, veterans, and first responders:

  • Use our Volunteer on the Spot Guideto coordinate a volunteer event in your office. Write cards for veterans in hospitals, make snack packs for family members visiting their loved ones, or come up with your own event! To volunteer onsite—visit our volunteer locator to find volunteer opportunities near you.
  • Support Hero’s Health. Your support will provide thousands of military families free lodging close to loved ones hospitalized for an illness, disease, or injury; prevent veterans from being in the emergency room, homeless, and incarcerated due to mental illness; and construct housing for families of injured servicemen and women.
  • Share our Military and Veteran health resources—get peer support, learn mental health warning signs, find PTSD assistance or housing support, and more.
  • Show some love with the Combined Federal CampaignMilitary and Federal employees are eligible to give during the 2017 campaign. Community Health Charities is one of the campaign’s oldest and largest partners, distributing millions of public sector contributions. November 6-12 is the campaign’s Veterans Week—support our nation’s military this week and support the Combined Federal Campaign.

For more stories to inspire action this Veteran’s day, and all year, check out these articles from and about those who have served our country:

My Greatest Honor: Serving Our Country – David Selzer, Vice President of Community Health Charities

Not All Battles are Fought in a War Zone – Thomas Bognanno, CEO of Community Health Charities

This Veteran’s Day, Support Our Heroes – Thomas Bognanno, CEO of Community Health Charities

I Don’t Deserve a Medal – Amanda Ponzar, CMO of Community Health Charities

Related:

How One Business “Lyft”ed Employee Participation To 90%

Based in San Francisco, Lyft is disrupting not only the transportation services industry but employee engagement as well. This month, the venture capital-backed company hosted a week of employee volunteer activities across the San Francisco Bay Area with an impressive participation rate of over 90%.

Read Lyft’s full story and how other Community Health Charities company partners are engaging with their employees.

American Express Kicks Off Giving Season

American Express kicked off the giving season and their workplace giving campaign with its 4th Annual Bingo-a-Thon. Community Health Charities works closely with American Express and was proud to be a part of this year’s event. Approximately 500 employees attended the kickoff that included food, prizes, and the chance to hear from and meet representatives from American Express’ charity partners.

Check out Community Health Charities’ Campaign Special Event Ideas toolkit for inspiration and ideas to get your team engaged.

Improve Your Heart Health

Charu Raheja, Community Health Charities board member, had no idea she was at risk for having a stroke until it happened to her. She describes the recovery process like “being two different people in the same lifetime.” Read her full recovery story.

October 29 is National Stroke Day. Share Community Health Charities’ Heart Health resources, 3 tips to maintaining heart health, and Charu’s advice on surviving and thriving after a stroke.

Help Us Earn GreatNonprofits’ 2017 Top Rating Again

GreatNonprofits is honoring highly regarded nonprofits with their 2017 Top-Rated List. Thanks to you, we earned the award in 2016, and now we’re asking for your help again.

Help us boost visibility for the work we do together to raise awareness and resources for health by posting a brief comment. It’s easy and only takes three minutes! Visit our webpage on GreatNonprofits and share your story.

Have We Created A Culture Of Bullying?

October is National Bullying Prevention Month. Do your part to create a safe environment for kids at school: read our CEO Tom Bognanno’s piece on Huffington Post; support the End Bullying cause, and share bullying resources.

Study Shows Decline

Fewer Americans are donating to charity. According to a study done by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, only 24 percent of Americans made a charitable donation in 2015—that’s six to seven percent less than a decade earlier.

The majority of charitable donations are coming from taxpayers who earn $100,000 or more annually—changes in the economy and giving patterns are to blame for the middle class’ decrease in giving.

So, how do we work together to build stronger, healthier communities? Find the causes that are important to your employees. Community Health Charities creates customized surveys  to help you discover the causes your employees care about. Plus, we offer volunteer opportunities, health resources, workplace giving campaigns, and more.

You’re Invited: Creating Effective Partnerships with Corporate Functions

Do You Know American Liver Foundation?

October is Liver Awareness and Liver Cancer Months. At a recent Community Health Charities’ event in Colorado, American Liver Foundation shared health resources and helped a woman whose husband is awaiting a liver transplant.

American Liver Foundation’s CEO Tom Nealon walks the talk. He’s raised over $1.5 million for research since running his first Boston Marathon for the American Liver Foundation on behalf of his friend Zac, a child born with liver disease.

Read impact stories about our charity partners.

Show Some Love With The Combined Federal Campaign

Military and Federal employees are eligible to participate in the 2017 Combined Federal Campaign. The federal workplace giving tradition is one of the largest workplace giving campaigns in the world, raising $256 million annually.

The campaign runs October through January—support Community Health Charities’ charity partners this campaign season!

American Cancer Society Is Attacking Cancer From Every Angle

 

American Cancer Society recently launched their new tagline: Attacking From Every Angle. The campaign focuses on everything the charity does to support those living with cancer, beyond research: free rides to treatment, insurance advice, lodging, and more.

That’s what American Cancer Society has been doing for over 100 years: funding breakthrough treatment and tirelessly supporting cancer patients. Check out their new website and videos.

Rebuilding Lives After Disaster

Whether it’s Harvey, Irma, Maria, or Las Vegas, stand with those working to rebuild their lives: volunteer your time, whether you live in the affected area or are helping from a distance, raise awareness, share resources for those affected by the disaster, and support Disaster Response.

Long-term recovery and rebuilding takes time and resources, as it is more than supplies and buildings—it’s rebuilding and restoring the lives of individuals, children, and families.

Support Women This October

Approximately 252,710 women will be diagnosed with invasive breast cancer in 2017. 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer during her lifetime.

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Take action for your own health and support the women in your life—mothers, daughters, wives, and friends by: sharing resources, supporting East Bay Breast Cancer and Women’s Health, and learning more about the top health issues affecting women.

Prioritize Mental Health And Wellbeing

October 10 was Mental Health Awareness Day. Continue this mindset of overall wellness into the rest of October by supporting Community Health Charities’ Mental Health and Wellbeing cause and sharing mental health resources.

Volunteer Toolbox: Craft Kids

Community Health Charities has easy onsite volunteer opportunities for your employees. This month’s featured tool is Craft Kits. One of the ways St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital creates a warm and comfortable environment is providing arts and crafts for patients. The Happy Cart Project provides materials for children while they are receiving care in the hospital or waiting for a loved one.

This volunteer opportunity, and many more, are available in our “Volunteer On the Spot” toolkit.

Additionally, find volunteer opportunities by zip code and keyword through our online search.

Campaign Resources: Coupon Book

Check out Community Health Charities’ library of campaign resources to help engage your employees and advance the causes you care about. This month’s featured resource is our Coupon Book: Incentivize campaign participation by rewarding employees with a coupon of appreciation. Determine incentives to offer, customize the coupon template, and share with your employees.

For more details and to explore the rest of our campaign tools, ideas, and guidelines, check out our Campaign Resources.

1,688,780 people will be diagnosed with cancer in the U.S. in 2017. An estimated 600,920 people will die from the disease.

Our charity partners are working to save lives and turn these statistics around.

  • Jude Children’s Research Hospital is leading the way the world understands, treats, and defeats childhood cancer and other life-threatening diseases.
  • American Cancer Society’s mission is to save lives, celebrate lives, and lead the fight for a world without cancer.
  • Leukemia and Lymphoma Society is working to cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families.
  • Susan G. Komen saves lives by meeting the most critical needs in our communities and investing in breakthrough research to prevent and cure breast cancer.
  • Cancer Research Institute is the world’s leading nonprofit organization dedicated exclusively to harnessing the immune system’s power to conquer all cancers.
  • Pancreatic Cancer Action Network is a nationwide network of people dedicated to working together to advance research, support patients and create hope for those affected by pancreatic cancer.

Join our charity partners this campaign season and build stronger, healthier communities free of cancer: